Tag Archives: How To

How To Clean Your Spiralizer

Spiralizing Tools

The number one easiest way to clean each of these wonderful spiralizing tools is to wash them under running water immediately after use. If you wash immediately after using, then any vegetable matter will easily slough off of the tool and its blades. Warm soapy water is more effective as it softens the vegetable matter even more. Simply run water over the blades, and use your kitchen brush if needed, then put the tool on your drying rack. The entire process takes 30 seconds.

If you don’t clean your spiralizer right away, then you’ll have some extra work to do. The entire Veggetti is dishwasher-proof, as are the blades on the Paderno, so for the most part, all you need to do is throw the appliance in the dishwasher and hit “go.” But there are times when particles of vegetable matter will cling to the blades. When that happens, there are two easy ways to clean out the debris without putting your fingers at risk.

One method is to use hot water with the sink power sprayer to force the particles out. The second is to use a clean toothbrush to gently scrub the sharp surfaces. (Buy them by the handful at the dollar store and keep a couple in your utensil drawer. You’ll be amazed at how useful they’ll be.)

For Julienne slicers of any type, hand-washing is recommended. Use the power-rinse at your sink and run hot water through the device to remove any food debris. Wash immediately after use if cutting zucchini or beets, which can leave stains.

 

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This post is an excerpt from “The Complete Vegetable Spiralizer Cookbook” by J.S. Amie. The book explains how to spiralize like a pro, and provides more delicious recipes than you can shake a stick at! Want a copy for yourself? Click the image below to pick it up on Amazon!
Complete Vegetable Spiralizer Cookbook

How to stir-fry your vegetable noodles

How to stir-fry your vegetable noodles

Stir-frying is a quick-cooking method that requires very little fat. The secret to successful stir-fries is pre-prep. All the ingredients should be chopped or cut as needed so that everything will cook quickly. Woks are purpose-built for stir-frying, but any large, heavy skillet will do as well.

Here’s a quick primer on how to stir fry:

  • Make sure your ingredients are dry.
  • Heat the oil over high heat, then add the aromatic ingredients (garlic, chilis, onions) and spices to the oil before adding any other ingredients. This allows the flavors to infuse the oil.
  • Add the rest of the ingredients, being careful not to overcrowd the pan. If necessary cook in small batches.
  • As with sautéing, you need to pay attention to the process; stir-frying is done over high heat and the ingredients can easily burn.

 

 

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This post is an excerpt from “The Complete Vegetable Spiralizer Cookbook” by J.S. Amie. The book explains how to spiralize like a pro, and provides more delicious recipes than you can shake a stick at!  Want a copy for yourself? Click the image below to pick it up on Amazon!
Complete Vegetable Spiralizer Cookbook

How to store leftover veggie noodles

How to store leftover veggie noodles

Leftover veggie noodles must be refrigerated, preferably in a container (glass or plastic) with an air-tight seal in the coldest part of the fridge. If the noodles have been cooked, or mixed with other hot ingredients, you can store them for up to 2 days. If the noodles are raw, they should be used within 24 hours. If you want to prevent discoloration, squeeze a little lemon juice over the raw pasta before storing.

 

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This post is an excerpt from “The Complete Vegetable Spiralizer Cookbook” by J.S. Amie. The book explains how to spiralize like a pro, and provides more delicious recipes than you can shake a stick at! Want a copy for yourself? Click the image below to pick it up on Amazon!
Complete Vegetable Spiralizer Cookbook

Tip: How to hold and use the Veggetti spiralizer without getting cut!

Veggetti - safety tip

As with anything in your kitchen that has a blade—blender, food processor, silverware drawer— the Veggetti can bite if you’re not careful. The blades are extremely sharp, so you need to be alert while you’re turning your vegetables into delicious, low-calorie spaghetti strands. Most mishaps occur when a hand slips while guiding the vegetable through the blades, or when someone sticks a finger into the blade during cleaning.

Keep in mind that very little force is necessary. All you need to do is gently twist your vegetables through, preferably using the Veggetti’s cap to grip the vegetable while you’re twisting it.

Here’s how to use the Veggetti safely:

STEP 1: Leave the skin on the gripping end of the vegetable. This gives you a more solid and less slippery surface to grip while you’re twisting the vegetable into the Veggetti.

Notes: For most vegetables—such as zucchinis, carrots, yellow squash—I simply grip the end of the vegetable with my hand. However, the Veggetti comes with a “cap” that has little spikes which help to grip slippery vegetables. I find that this cap works well for dense vegetables (carrots), but not for soft vegetables (zucchini). In my experience, the cap will shred the end of soft vegetables, making it even more difficult to push them through the Veggetti. Another option to get the last inch of goodness out of each vegetable, is to stab a fork into the vegetable instead of using your fingers or the cap.

STEP 2: the Veggetti cutter looks like an hourglass with two open ends. Each “funnel” has a different blade so that you can vary the type of vegetable pasta you get—spaghetti-type strands or wider, udon noodles. Choose the width of noodle you want and guide your vegetable into that blade.

Notes: You’ll quickly develop a preference for either the spaghetti or the udon noodle size for each vegetable. I love both, depending on the dish. Generally, I prefer the thinner spaghetti noodles for denser vegetables (carrots, beets, etc). For raw or lightly cooked dishes, I also prefer the thinner spaghetti noodles. However, the thicker udon noodles are great for soups, or dishes with thick sauces.

STEP 3: Once your vegetable is cleaned, scrubbed, or peeled, simply place the end you want to cut into the Veggetti and begin turning it, just as you would when sharpening a pencil. The “pasta” strands will begin appearing as soon as the turning starts. Discard the left over portion of the vegetable or save it for another use, like enriching soup.

Notes: Keep your fingers away from the blades! The Veggetti is known to bite if you’re not careful. The best way to keep your fingers safe is to make sure the part of the vegetable you’re gripping is dry, unpeeled, and firm. Otherwise use the Veggetti’s cap or use a fork to grip the vegetable while you’re spiralizing it.

Veggetti - safety tip 3

For zucchini, I like to leave the stem on and use it as a grip while spiralizing. I find this to work so well that I never use the Veggetti’s cap or a fork when spiralizing zucchini.

Veggetti - safety tip 3b

For carrots, parsnips, yellow squash, and other vegetables shaped like cones, I like to hold the thin end while spiralizing the thick end so I can use more and waste less of the vegetable.

For eggplant, I like to use the thicker cut because the thinner pasta strands are more fragile than the thicker pasta. Keep in mind that eggplant noodles are notoriously fragile and break easily.

Veggetti - safety tip 3c

One trick I’ve learned is to hold the Veggetti a little differently than shown in the manufacturer’s instructions. The spiralizing process tends to produce a lot of excess “vegetable” matter and it can get a little messy, with bits of veggie goop falling out the opposite end of the Veggetti and into your plate. I like to cup that end of the Veggetti with my left hand when I spiralize with my right hand. This allows me to catch the vegetable goop in my palm so I can discard it easily.

 

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This post is an excerpt from “The Complete Vegetable Spiralizer Cookbook” by J.S. Amie. The book explains how to spiralize like a pro, and provides more delicious recipes than you can shake a stick at!  Want a copy for yourself? Click the image below to pick it up on Amazon!
Complete Vegetable Spiralizer Cookbook

What kind of noodles can you make with a Paderno spiralizer?

The Paderno Spiralizer

What kind of noodles can you make with a Paderno spiralizer?

Best for: large quantities of noodles, and greater variety of cuts and shreds. It takes more counter space and more time to set up than a Veggetti, but once it’s set up, it works much faster

The Paderno Spiralizer is a hand-powered tool, which means it is neither battery-powered nor electrical. About the size of a counter-top mixer, it is safer than other hand-held vegetable spiralizers, such as the Veggetti, because the vegetable is inserted into the machine, and directed toward the cutting blades by the action of a turning crank—the cook’s hands never get anywhere near the sharp surfaces.

The Paderno has three blades that produce three different types of noodles:

What kind of noodles can you make with a Paderno spiralizer?

BLADE A” — Thin Spaghetti-sized strands, rings and crescents.

BLADE B” — Thick udon or linguini-size strands, rings and crescents.

BLADE C” — Wide, flat strands, rings and crescents.

Note—the width of the strands from Blade C depend on the diameter of the vegetable/fruit being cut. This blade also shreds certain vegetables like cabbage, which makes it useful for quickly making slaws and salads.

 

*****
This post is an excerpt from “The Complete Vegetable Spiralizer Cookbook” by J.S. Amie. The book explains how to spiralize like a pro, and provides more delicious recipes than you can shake a stick at!  Want a copy for yourself? Click the image below to pick it up on Amazon!
Complete Vegetable Spiralizer Cookbook